© 2014 by Miss Jenny ELL Proudly created with Wix.com

  • Instagram
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter

Reading Strategies

These strategies are not only great for ELLs but for all students. The Common Core Standards that align with these strategies are list as well. If you are interested in any of the strategies click on the image and it will take you to my store on TPT

Slideshow

(Click Arrows to see different charts)

 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.6, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5.a &

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5.c

 

It is so important to activate prior knowledge before reading a story. These charts provide students an opportunity to organize their knowledge on the vocabulary that was front loaded and their prior knowledge before reading the story.

Build Schema Chart

 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.6, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5.a &

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5.c

 

One of my favorite activities for the beginning of the year, is to take two hula hoops and have the students work in partners to sort books by fiction and nonfiction.This is great for close reading and requiring students to go back into text and find evidence and having to justify their answer on why the story is that particular genre. For example "The story is a fantasy because cats do not sing songs about their shoes". Great for older and younger students but especially great for younger students introducing the strategy of going back into the text to find evidence.

Determining Genres 

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.6, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5.a &

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5.c

 

Students will make a connection to themselves (text to self), another book (text to text) and to the world (text to the world).

Making A Connection

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3

This is a great literacy strategy for emergent readers to work on sequencing. You can either do it as a chart in a large group or students can do it independently.

First...Then

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.1

This charts introduces to students how to do questioning which is a skill required by the common core. The teacher writes down questions that the students have before and during the story. Then, the students come up and answer their questions after reading the story.

Questioning Chart

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3

It is important for students to recognize their misconceptions especially in nonfiction texts. 

Misconceptions

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3

Students use their senses their visualize the story. They can either draw a picture or write in a journal or use the differentiated graphic organizer pictured

Visualization

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3

Students of all levels can do cause and effect . If some of your students are at a beginning and entering level, they can draw and label the cause and effect. Bridging and reaching students can write sentences about the cause and effect of a story.

 

Tip: Laura Numeroff's If You Give a Mouse a Cookie series are great for cause and effect!

Picture from Snowy Day Project from Smitten with First 

Cause and Effect

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.3

Students making a list of facts or a fact ladder is a great way for students organize their ideas and their new learning.

Fact Ladder

Kindergarten:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.3

1st grade:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.1.7

RL.K.2 & RL.K.3
RL.1.2 & RL.1.3

This is great way to implement close reading and higher order thinking skills. The students have to come up with the main idea and then have to find supporting details from the text(s) to justify their rationale for the main idea.

Main Idea and Supporting Details

 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.6, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5.a &

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.K.5.c

 

Students will use details from the story to draw a conclusion. "When you read and think you can come up with something unique"

Draw Conclusions

IMG_4097.JPG

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2

Students of all levels can sequence a story in order. If some of your students are at a beginning and entering level, they can draw and label what happened in order. Bridging and reaching students can write sentences about what happened in the story. In a regular education classroom, special education and an ELL classroom, it is important to have differentiate worksheets to meet all of the needs of your students.

Sequencing

Kindergarten:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.3

1st grade:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.1.7

Students will analyze what a person or animal have, are, and can do. Great for Non-fiction research. 

Can Have Are

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.1

One strategy to help students find fun facts is have them find facts that make them think, react and question. This is also great to help build their higher order thinking skills.

Find Fun Facts

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3

Under the "somebody" box the students write (or draw) the character

Under the "wanted" box the student will write (or draw) what the character wanted

Under the "but" box the student will write (or draw) what problem that interfered with the desire

Under the "so" box the student will write (or draw) the solution to the problem

Somebody Wanted But So

IMG_5178.JPG

Kindergarten:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.3

1st grade:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.1.7

Students will write 2 or 3 facts and draw a picture of that fact from the story or stories regarding the same topic. It is also great for students who are struggling with opinion versus facts.

3 Box Facts

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.2 & CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.K.3

As part of the CCSS, students are expected to identify the characters, the setting and the main events. These differentiated graphic organizers help students of all levels to identify this aspects of the story.

Story Map

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3

In our district, we do something called Structured Word Inquiry. We study prefixes, bases, and suffixes. We  study the meaning and structure to help us understand the word. 

Study Affixes